Thomas Gallet

  • published Call for concept notes 2021-03-04 10:54:41 -0600

    Call for Concept Notes - Appel de Notes Conceptuelles

    The Partnerships for Development Innovation Branch is pleased to inform you that the Department has launched a call for concept notes – Education for Refugee and Displaced Children and Youth in Sub- Saharan Africa valued at approximately $40 million over five (5) years.

    This call seeks to enhance equitable and inclusive learning outcomes for refugee, internally displaced and host community children and youth, particularly girls and adolescent girls living in select countries of Sub-Saharan Africa. Targeted capacity building, combined with small grants for core activities and locally-driven education-related programming and policy engagement, would amplify refugee and internally displaced persons’ (IDPs) voices and increase access to quality education. The call is open to Canadian organizations with demonstrated experience implementing education programming in fragile and conflict-affected contexts and providing capacity building to community-based organizations. Selected projects will facilitate the empowerment of refugee-led organizations (RLOs) and IDP-led organizations by targeting barriers to their meaningful participation in the education sector.

    Canadian organizations will have until 12:00 p.m. (noon) Eastern Time on April 14, 2021, to submit their application. Applicants may send questions about this call by email to [email protected]. Questions must be submitted before 12:00 p.m. (noon) Eastern Time on March 24, 2021, and answers will be published on the Questions and Answers page for this call.  The Department will also host a webinar on March 17, 20201 to review information pertaining to this call and the application form. Time will be dedicated to questions and answers. Further details will be provided to applicants on the call page. 


    Le secteur des Partenariats pour l’innovation dans le développement a le plaisir de vous informer que le ministère a lancé l’appel de notes conceptuelles – Éducation pour les enfants et les jeunes réfugiés et déplacés en Afrique subsaharienne d’une valeur d’environ 40 millions de dollars et qui sera réparti sur cinq ans.

    Le présent appel vise à améliorer les résultats d’apprentissage équitables et inclusifs pour les enfants et les jeunes réfugiés, déplacés à l’intérieur du pays et en communauté d’accueil, particulièrement pour les filles et les adolescentes vivant dans certains pays d’Afrique subsaharienne. Le renforcement ciblé des capacités, combiné à de petites subventions pour les activités de base et des programmes d’éducation et d’engagement politiques menés localement amplifierait les voix des réfugiés et des personnes déplacées à l’intérieur de leur propre pays (PDI) tout en favorisant l’accès à une éducation de qualité. L’appel est ouvert aux organisations canadiennes qui ont de l’expérience démontrée dans la mise en œuvre de programmes d’éducation dans des contextes fragiles ou en situation de conflit et dans le renforcement des capacités des organisations communautaires. Les projets choisis faciliteront l’autonomisation des organisations dirigées par des réfugiés ou par des PDI en ciblant les obstacles à leur participation significative dans le secteur de l’éducation.

    Les organisations canadiennes auront jusqu’au 14 avril 2021 à 12 h (midi), heure de l’Est, pour soumettre leur demande. Les demandeurs peuvent envoyer leurs questions au sujet de cet appel par courriel à l’adresse [email protected]. Les questions doivent être soumises avant 12 h (midi), heure de l’Est, le 24 mars 2021, et les réponses seront publiées sur la page de Questions et réponses de cet appel. Le ministère tiendra également un webinaire le 17 mars 2021, afin d'examiner l'information relative à cet appel et au formulaire de demande. Du temps sera consacrée aux questions et réponses. Plus de détails seront fournis aux demandeurs sur la page de l’appel.


     

    International Development Week events and programs are undertaken with the financial support of the Government of Canada provided through Global Affairs Canada.

     


  • SCIC Announces Community Driven Events for International Development Week 2021

    Next week, the Saskatchewan Council for International Cooperation, an organization focused on building momentum towards a just, equitable, and sustainable world, has an extremely exciting event line up for their International Development Week 2021 campaign, happening from February 7th - 13th. 

    International Development Week (IDW) is a national initiative to engage Canadians from coast-to-coast-to-coast with the collective work of ending global poverty, advancing human rights, combating climate change and improving equitable access to health and education the world over. Throughout the week (February 7-13, 2021) SCIC will highlight contributions toward sustainable global development, that leaves no one behind, and share stories and skills for folks across Saskatchewan to get involved.

    Throughout the week, SCIC will be highlighting and engaging Saskatchewan change-makers with guest speaker and national icons, Notorious Cree and Samra Zafar, along with hearing from forward-thinking organizations such as Black in Sask, Mackenzie Art Gallery, and Common Weal Community Arts

    Inspired by Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy (FIAP) Action Area of Inclusive Governance, SCIC’s BEtter Campaign recognizes that sustainable development means institutions, policies, processes and services need to be accessible, accountable and responsive to all peoples. Change takes all of us; and a sustainable world is an equitable, diverse and inclusive world.


    About Saskatchewan Council International Cooperation

    SCIC is a Canadian NGO that helps Saskatchewan people act on their desire to make the world a better place. We do this by educating Saskatchewan people about global issues like poverty, health, and human rights, and encouraging individuals to take meaningful action.

    We are committed to the recognition of the dignity of all people and their right to self-determination, to the protection of the world’s fragile environment, to the equitable distribution of power, and to the promotion of global understanding, cooperation, peace and justice through mutual learning, partnership, transparency and solidarity.


    Media Contact: Thom Gallet, Saskatchewan Council International Cooperation, (306) 757-4669, [email protected]


  • published Women Resisting Extractivism Film Club in Events 2021-02-05 12:04:59 -0600

  • published Ziyang (Zeo) Li in Global Citizen Nominees 2021 2021-02-04 15:51:50 -0600

    Ziyang Li, an advocate for equality for all immigrants and marginalized populations.

    As the Vice President of Student Affairs at the University of Regina Students' Union (URSU), Zeo works with his team members to carry out successful campaigns and programs that benefit students. These include a Mental Wellness Campaign for students from diverse communities (domestic, international, LGBTQ+), designing a Community Service Month for supporting students to initiate their community projects by providing micro-grants, as well as promoting dialogue by organizing a Next Gen Leaders Debate during the 2020 Saskatchewan election. 

    With a keen interest in food security for students at the University of Regina, Zeo helped to expand the URSU Cares Pantry and volunteered at the Public Interest Research Group’s (RPIRG) Green Patch. Together, Zeo and the volunteer team maintained the daily operation of the garden, which produced 2700 pounds of vegetables that were donated to the University community. 

    Zeo’s passion for volunteerism started soon after arriving in Canada. At Revera Retirement Living, he assisted the event manager with event setup and organizing. At the Regina Open Door Society, he volunteers with the Youth Program and the Interpretation Program. He also contributes his efforts to mentorship with newcomer youth and organized a Chinese Culture Workshop in Regina to educate and share his passion, culture and knowledge. At the Regina Public Library, he tutors newcomer English, and learns about cultures and diversity at the same time including increasing his knowledge about the cultures of Indigenous Peoples.  

    Zeo is currently pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology at the University of Regina, as well as a Certificate of Non-Profit Organization Management.

    What does Global Citizenship mean to you?

    Global citizenship is the idea that people from diverse communities start their initiatives with strong passions and want to benefit the larger community in different ways. 

    Where do you find your inspiration?

    I find my inspiration from my experiences interacting and working with different organizations that aim to build bridges in order to support local and global communities.  My first inspiration in Canada started at the Regina Open Door Society, and I have become empowered and gained passion to volunteer in their programs to this day. Their inspiration keeps me encouraged to support different communities through many non-profit organizations in Saskatchewan.  

    What do you see as one of the most encouraging or innovative trends that is creating positive change in our world right now?

    Food security is one of the major concerns during this pandemic, and that is why I believe increasing the amount of community gardens as well as indoor gardens will contribute to the availability of more convenient food supplies to people in need. In 2021, the two student groups I am with are planning to initiate a new garden space in order to increase food security in Regina.   


  • The Larsens advocate for anti-racism and gender equality on a global scale.

    Simon Granovsky-Larsen, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Politics and International Studies at the University of Regina where he teaches courses on international development and international politics. 

    Since 2004, Simon has worked on and off in Guatemala as a human rights accompanier, independent journalist, and academic researcher. His recent projects have looked at violence against land and environmental defenders; changes to paramilitary violence; the militarization of extractive industries, including the security practices of Canadian mining projects and other transnational mega-development projects; and the role of social movements and agrarian conflicts in the Guatemalan peace process. 

    Simon has taken students to Guatemala on a global social justice field trip, and maintains a strong supportive relationship with local campesino (peasant) groups while connecting the example of oppression of Indigenous Peoples in Guatemala to global contexts.

    Simon’s work has appeared in various journals, books and publications and in 2019 Simon published two books on social movements, neoliberal capitalism and violence in Latin America. Simon is particularly interested in bottom-up development projects that reflect local interests and knowledge, and that aim at structural transformation at the local and global levels. 

    What does Global Citizenship mean to you?

    Global Citizenship is present in my life mainly as a state of mind, a constant reminder of the interconnection of all people and ecosystems. The requirements of our daily lives can sometimes make it difficult to keep anyone in mind other than ourselves and our closest loved ones, but the concept of Global Citizenship easily brings me back to my responsibility to others. It encapsulates an enormous range of global and local connections that I’ve come to understand myself to be a part of (and many more that I’ve yet to appreciate), connects them with important values such as justice, solidarity, and sustainability, and reminds me of my responsibility to act on those values.

    Where do you find your inspiration?

    I draw my inspiration from the incredible people I work with: students in Canada and activists in Guatemala. Teaching International Studies at the undergraduate level puts me in constant conversation with young people who are often exploring ideas associated with Global Citizenship for the first time. Each year, students bring new concerns and insights to the classroom, helping keep my own appreciation of Global Citizenship fresh. I am also fortunate to do research and solidarity work with people in the campesino social movement in Guatemala. Activists there have shown me that it’s possible to do things like reclaim land, forge new communities, build solidarity economies, and push for legal change, all despite the presence of violence and dispossession. I’m constantly inspired and humbled by people who face extreme hardship but refuse to stop organizing collectively to make the world a better place.

    What do you see as one of the most encouraging or innovative trends that is creating positive change in our world right now?

    I believe strongly that Black Lives Matter and other movements for racial justice that we’ve seen in 2020 and 2021 will create lasting positive change. Of course, the struggle against colonialism and white supremacy have never subsided, but many factors have come together over the last year so that those struggles have taken on new energy and chipped away significantly at colonial legacies. The cries for Black lives reverberated across borders faster than almost any previous movement, and people in positions of power have been forced to listen. This also amplifies Indigenous demands for self-determination and other anti-colonial movements, as the structures that sustain white supremacy are being called into question in ways that are impossible to ignore. Movements rise and fade, and any noticeable steps will be small ones, but I do think that the world is being re-made in important ways right now.


  • published Shayne Lazarowich in Global Citizen Nominees 2021 2021-02-04 15:46:38 -0600

    Shayne Lazarowich is a musician, songwriter, internationalist, anti-racist organizer, community enabler and advocate for social justice.

    Shayne Lazarowich is a musician, songwriter, internationalist, anti-racist organizer, community enabler, and advocate for multiculturalism and reconciliation. His music reaches deep into your soul, and is a shoutout for peace, harmony, and social justice for all.

    Shayne founded Rock Against Racism Sask in 2018 and coordinates multicultural community events that use the power of song and gathering to create change. Shayne has coordinated the work of the Prince Albert Multicultural Council (PAMC) as its Executive Director and worked with the Métis Addiction Council of Saskatchewan Inc. (MACSI) as Director of Communications. He has served as a board member for the Prince Albert and District Chamber of Commerce, as President of the Canadian Mental Health Association (PA Branch), and a board member for the Saskatchewan Association of Immigrant Settlement and Integration Agencies (SAISIA).  Shayne’s career includes work with Indigenous Peoples and Newcomers to Canada, and he has been involved in several other organizations, including the Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan and the Prince Albert Diversity-Wise Committee.

    Shayne has lived and worked internationally, in various capacities and contexts, for a substantial part of his adult life.  His work has taken him to Guatemala for two years, Taiwan for eight years, and more recently, to Nicaragua for three years, working with organizations such as Canada World Youth/Jeunesse Canada Monde and El Instituto de Promoción Humana (INPRHU). Shayne currently resides between Saskatoon, Canada and Estelí, Nicaragua.

    What does Global Citizenship mean to you? 

    I like to think of “Global Citizenship” as going beyond the borders of one's own community, country, or culture (physically, or otherwise) to learn, to participate, to contribute, and to support others. Citizenship, of any kind, includes the responsibility to help and support where help is needed, and to give what one can, rather than merely taking.

    Where do you find your inspiration?

    I find great inspiration in people of all walks of life - in their respective music and art, as well as in their collective struggle to overcome and to push for greater equity and justice throughout the world.

    What do you see as one of the most encouraging or innovative trends that is creating positive change in our world right now?

    Of course, there are many encouraging trends (as well as some not so encouraging trends), but one thing that has helped a lot in recent Rock Against Racism Sask work has been the rapid emergence of multiple platforms, technologies, and other services for the production and delivery of online interviews, livestreams, and other virtual events.  This has been especially useful during these times of the COVID-19 pandemic and social gathering restrictions. While online activities and events may not have the same feel/appeal as do in-person activities and events, there is great opportunity to reach larger, more diverse, and more distant audiences. For our most recent Rock Against Racism Sask event, for example, we were able to reach thousands of people from across the province, even in the north and other remote areas, and beyond the borders of Saskatchewan and even Canada.  This would never have been possible, of course, with a traditional in-person style event, localized in Saskatoon. With these events we have also been able to reach a much more diverse audience, including differently-abled people, seniors, and others who may be less interested/able to attend an in-person event.

     

  • published Samia Sami in Global Citizen Nominees 2021 2021-02-04 15:33:50 -0600

    Samia Sami and her passion for sustainable innovation.

    Samia Sami is pursuing a degree in Electrical Engineering at the University of Saskatchewan (UofS). By specializing in power and energy, she combines her passion for the environment with a love of design and technology.  

    Samia conducted two research projects in renewable energy, including the use of artificial intelligence to predict the security status of renewable microgrids in remote communities across Canada and has received the People’s Choice Award in recognition of her research. As a UofS delegate, Samia presented her research at the Women in Science and Engineering National Conference in Toronto.

    Samia demonstrates a strong commitment to the advancement of sustainable energy in Saskatchewan. She has been selected from Canada to be the 2020's Top IEEE Power and Energy Society Scholar. As a Chair of IEEE Power and Energy Society (PES) Student Chapter at the UofS, Samia is committed to providing an international platform for post-secondary students to advance their careers and education in sustainable energy. 

    Samia is deeply passionate about sustainable innovation.  She has co-founded the Saskatoon Solar Shelter project to provide access to sustainable public transit in the city. Samia has been recognized as one of Canada’s Top 25 Under 25 Environmentalists by The Starfish Canada for her contributions to the advancement of sustainable energy.

    Samia coordinated the 2020 IEEE Illumination Conference in Saskatchewan which increased the importance of equality, diversity and inclusion in engineering. The Conference promoted women in engineering and built self-confidence among female engineering students by recognizing the importance of having women work together and share experiences. As Vice President of Engineers Without Borders (EWB) USask Chapter, Samia manages the EWB USask Chapter operations and collaborates with the EWB network on environmental sustainability and gender inclusion initiatives.

    Samia is committed to the ongoing pursuit of knowledge and promoting actions necessary to achieve her vision of a prosperous community where people belonging to all races, cultures, religions, and gender collectively work towards a sustainable future.

    What does Global Citizenship mean to you?

    Global citizenship constitutes recognizing and fulfilling our rights and responsibilities as a common humanity. The journey towards global citizenship starts by acknowledging that we have much more in common than we have differences and continues with utilizing our skills, knowledge, and expertise to leave the world better than we found it. For a global citizen, no change is too small. Every change starts from within yourself and then ripples across your family and friends, peers and colleagues, school and university, community, city, province, country, and the world. On a personal level, determined to foresee my vision of a diverse, sustainable community, as a global citizen, I will continue to help others find their voice in the areas that matter to them the most and inspire them to follow on my sustainable journey.

    Where do you find your inspiration?

    People like me need to fight to have our voices heard. As a woman, a person of colour, and an immigrant, there are many opportunities in life for which people like me are deemed unfit. As the first female in my family to pursue an engineering degree, I struggled to break down the cultural barriers in my community. My parents are my greatest source of inspiration. I have received a lot of guidance and motivation from my parents throughout my education. My father is a proud power engineer and highly engaged in his profession. He has helped shape my academic career. My mother is an excellent role-model who, by raising three kids while completing her graduate studies, demonstrated that with the right mindset, one can achieve anything. With each twist in my life, my parents have helped me pause, reflect, and grow.

    What do you see as one of the most encouraging or innovative trends that is creating positive change in our world right now?

    I view diversity and inclusion in Artificial Intelligence (AI) as one of the most innovative and inspiring trends. From medical devices, smartphones, social media to sustainability and self-driving cars, AI is being increasingly integrated into our daily lives. However, what makes diversity in AI beautiful is that with an equal voice, representation and opportunities, AI-based solutions would more accurately and creatively seek to solve the real concerns of the global population. AI assists in turning our ideas into reality. By making AI education and career opportunities more accessible to women and recognizing women as agents of change, the industry would benefit from the diversity of thoughts and opinions, creativity, and innovation to help shape our future. As the pace of change in the AI industry accelerates, a paradigm shift in diversity is emerging. I believe this paradigm shift in diversity is the future of AI.

     


  • published Namarta Kochar in Global Citizen Nominees 2021 2021-02-04 15:26:35 -0600

    Namarta Kochar

    Namarta Kochar, a community leader advocating for diversity, equity and inclusion, healthcare, the environment, gender equality and poverty.

    Namarta Kochar, Special Projects Officer in Strategic Communications at the University of Saskatchewan, has helped strengthen various spheres throughout Saskatchewan, and helped address and bring awareness to global issues facing our community such as diversity, equity and inclusion, healthcare, the environment, and poverty.   A recognized humanitarian, change-maker and mentor, Namarta has been a catalyst for improving the quality of life for others in our community and promoting human dignity for all.  

    Namarta’s extensive list of community leadership, volunteer activities and philanthropic efforts have included the Saskatoon Food Bank and Learning Centre, Dress for Success Saskatoon, Ovarian Cancer Canada, the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society of Canada, The Arthritis Society, Saskatoon Salvation Army, the Alzheimer Society, the Children’s Wish Foundation, Postmedia Raise-A-Reader, the Children’s Hospital Foundation of Saskatchewan, the Royal University Hospital Foundation, the Saskatoon Community Foundation, YWCA Saskatoon, the Secret Santa Foundation, as well as the 8th World Summit of Young Entrepreneurs, a United Nations Global Partnership Program involving governments, multilateral agencies, and multinational corporations, held in Brussels, Belgium.

    Namarta currently serves as the first visible minority female chair of the City of Saskatoon’s Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Advisory Committee, which aims to create an inclusive community, and has also served on the City of Saskatoon’s Environmental Advisory Committee.

    Namarta was the recipient of the highest volunteer award in Saskatchewan, the Saskatchewan Volunteer Medal, the Community Leadership award from Leadership Saskatoon, and the Living in Harmony Award from the City of Saskatoon for her promotion of intercultural harmony in the community.

    What does Global Citizenship mean to you?

    Global citizenship embraces a world that values the importance of social responsibility, promotes respect for all beings, and works together to ensure human dignity for all.  By focusing on our collective strengths, addressing global issues, and learning from one another, we can build a world in which everyone can thrive.  Through education and awareness, we can learn and understand global issues affecting our world today, and through cooperation, empathy, and volunteerism, we can make a positive difference and help create a just and fair world for all.   

    Where do you find your inspiration?

    My biggest inspiration is my late mother.  Throughout my life, she always taught me to have courage and stand up for what I believe in, and to do it with respect and compassion.  She always believed that if you are able to help someone, then you should in whatever way you can.  Through her example and her teachings, I have tried to become an engaged citizen and help bring awareness and address issues facing the world.  I am also inspired by our amazing Saskatchewan community, and how time and time again, through challenges, crises, and even a pandemic, people come together to help their neighbours and fellow citizens.  It is heartwarming to see and an encouraging reminder that we are stronger when we work together.

    What do you see as one of the most encouraging or innovative trends that is creating positive change in our world right now?

    The focus and understanding of the importance of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion is creating positive change in our world right now.  In line with the many elements of global citizenship, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion promotes cooperation, belonging, and respect, at the same time appreciating and acknowledging our differences.  Through Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, we learn from each other, share experiences, have empathy for one another, and help build a world where everyone feels welcomed, valued and supported.

     


  • published Dr. Margot Hurlbert in Global Citizen Nominees 2021 2021-02-04 15:15:15 -0600

    Margot Hurlbert, a life-long story of a leader in global innovation and volunteerism.

    After practicing law in Regina, Dr. Margot Hurlbert became a professor at the University of Regina in the Departments of Justice Studies and Sociology and Social Studies.  In 2018 she was awarded the Canada Research Chair in Climate Change, Energy, and Sustainability Policy at the Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy where she is the Lead of the Science, Technology and Innovation Research Cluster. She is a Senior Research Fellow of the Earth Systems Governance Project, and was the Coordinating Lead Author of a chapter of the Special Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) on Land and Climate.  Margot is Review Editor for the North America Chapter of Working Group II of the IPCC and currently works on Future Earth’s Working Group on Transformations.

    Margot has authored and co-authored many journal articles, papers and presentations on rights to water, sanitation, hygiene and resilience in a global context, diverse community energy futures, Indigenous energy justice, and gender and climate change.

    Margot’s research focus is on governance and climate change, energy and water; interrogating laws, policies and practices that will address both the problem of climate change and adaptation, and mitigation of changing climate. Her current passion is determining participatory governance mechanisms and constructing action based imaginaries that help us achieve our Paris goals—net zero carbon emissions by 2050. 

    Margot has a B. Admin. (Great Distinction) from the University of Regina, an LL.B. and LL.M. (Osgoode) and a Ph.D. (University of Amsterdam). Margot lives with her family in Regina, SK and has a long history of volunteerism in the community at the YMCA, the Canadian Bar Association, the SCEP Center, the Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan, and the Regina Women’s Network.

    What does Global Citizenship mean to you?

    Global Citizenship is an important narrative for me because it connects me with all other people on the planet.  By thinking of our interconnections, I can begin to imagine what a world might be like where we achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, and all people have equitable access to our world’s resources.  Global citizenship is also essential when we think of addressing climate change, redressing the impacts of climate change, and preserving our Earth for future generations.  In addition to interconnections, Global Citizenship also signifies the action of citizenship.  This is the necessity of not only being a citizen in our locale, our province, our country, but being a citizen of our world – getting active in international organization and causes, and taking responsibility for our actions.  For me the work with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and with Future Earth has provided me with the opportunity to meet, to learn from, and make friends with people around the world.  Global citizenship engenders responsible decision making because our actions have an impact on citizens everywhere.

    Where do you find your inspiration?

    My inspiration as a teacher comes from students.  Students include the young and old people in my classes, the students around the world who have been participating in climate strikes, and students of all backgrounds and types.  (The defining characteristic of a ‘student’ is that of a ‘learner.’)  At any age and stage we (including myself) can be a student and learn new ways of doing things sustainably and equitably.  In the most recent past I have really been inspired by our young people and their passion for global justice and addressing climate change.  I was very inspired when Greta and several other young climate activists presented our IPCC negotiating team of authors in Geneva with a letter of thanks during the Land and Climate Report’s plenary presentation in 2019 to governments.  I’ve framed that letter and keep it at my desk.

    What do you see as one of the most encouraging or innovative trends that is creating positive change in our world right now?

    One of the most encouraging or innovative trends creating positive change right now is the peaceful protests of students and all people to raise awareness of climate change and the inequity of its impacts and future risks around the world.  COVID-19 is a crisis and warrants our utmost attention and vigilance in keeping everyone safe.  However, the risks and threat of climate change, extreme droughts, wildfires, species extinction, increased poverty and famine, multi-breadbasket failures, have not gone away.  Our current crisis is providing us with the opportunity of rethinking our travel and other consumption habits, so that we might build back a more sustainable local and global community in the future. 


  • published Mac-Miland Nji Mokom in Global Citizen Nominees 2021 2021-02-04 15:10:13 -0600

    Mac-Miland Nji Mokom, an activist fighting poverty and gender inequality.

    Mac-Miland Nji Mokom is a Registered Social Worker with the Saskatchewan Association of Social Workers (SASW), currently working with the Canadian Red Cross. Mac-Miland holds two degrees, one in Sociology and Anthropology and a second degree in Social Work from the University of Regina.

    Mac-Miland was actively engaged in multiple youth development programs in Cameroon including serving as the Regional Secretary of the Cameroon Alliance for Youth Movement (CAMAYM) where he aided several socio-economic programs in Northwest Cameroon.

    As a volunteer with Youth Outreach Programme Cameroon, Mac-Miland engaged in various community regeneration programs. These included life skills, entrepreneurship and reproductive health training, tree planting, radiosensitization, and youth policy advocacy which increased skills development and improved social responsibility among young Cameroonians. His work included fighting poverty and gender inequality and empowering youth to make informed decisions and exercise their fundamental rights to education, employment and healthcare.

    Mac-Miland believes that each and every one of us has a role to play in making the world a better place.

    What does Global Citizenship mean to you?

    To me, a global citizen is a citizen of the world, someone who does not limit their identity to national boundaries, rather feels free to create an impact in the world as a whole. A global citizen takes responsibility to ensure the world is a better place to live in, they take initiative to better the community in which they find themselves at a particular time, ensuring it creates a global impact. Global Citizenship means being part of a series of individual and collective actions that join to make the world a better place. It means thinking globally and acting locally and understanding the global system and taking gradual and small steps to progressively achieve collective good

    Where do you find your inspiration?

    The plight of the underprivileged causes me to seek solutions and alternative means to improve their lives. I am motivated by the desire to create a meaningful society where everyone is given equal opportunities to prosper and grow in all areas of life.

    What do you see as one of the most encouraging or innovative trends that is creating positive change in our world right now?

    Continuously educating ourselves and society about racism and its impact in our society has transformed the world into a better place. While racism may not be completely eradicated in our societies, there has been a great improvement over the years. I think that if people are respected and treated equally regardless of their cultural backgrounds, race and sexual orientation, the world will be a better place to live in. 

    Digitization has made life easier for people around the globe. In the area of trade, being able to trade online without third parties has connected producers with consumers. In the health field, many apps are available to improve global health. In education, online courses are not only cheaper but there is increased access to studies in countries and schools where people would otherwise not be able to obtain the information. For employment, IT jobs, network marketing and increased remote working using various online means has increased individual and family incomes. In agricultural, improved technologies and production such as greenhouses has improved farming, food production and food security.


  • published Hannah Tait in Global Citizen Nominees 2021 2021-02-04 13:30:45 -0600

    Hannah Tait, an emerging young leader in international cooperation, peace and justice.

    A recognized youth leader, Hannah has been chosen to participate in many national and global forums on wide-ranging topics where she advocates for stronger international relations through trade and diplomacy, human rights, women’s rights, diversity, and inclusion. 

    Hannah was part of a delegation of the National Youth Ambassador Caucus hosted by Global Vision and focused on diversity and inclusion. At the 2019 Digital Citizenship Ambassador Summit she focused on online misinformation and its role in hindering strong democracies around the world.  

    Hannah was a member of Junior Team Canada on a trade mission to Peru in February 2020 facilitated by the Canadian-Peruvian Embassy and non-profit organization, Global Vision. She focused on best practices to improve international trade and international cooperation and advocated for Indigenous participation and the duty to consult when undertaking mining operations. 

    Hannah was invited to represent Canada in 2020’s Asian Pacific Economic Cooperation Voices of the Future (APEC VOF) event hosted in Malaysia, where she engaged with youth from the 21 member economies with a focus on equitable economic recovery and the challenges of distributing technology to women in developing countries to facilitate financial and educational success.

    Hannah has recently been accepted to be a representative for the Regina-Lewvan district in Equal Voice’s Daughters of the Vote program where she plans to advocate for national and international empowerment of women, and digital citizenship that will promote a healthy democracy in Canada and abroad.

    Hannah is currently pursuing a BBA in International Business and a BA in Political Science at the University of Regina.

    What does Global Citizenship mean to you?

    Global Citizenship is about working towards something bigger than ourselves by valuing differences and similarities. Global Citizenship means being open to and valuing different perspectives. It recognizes mutual challenges and opportunities that face everyone in the world. It celebrates uniqueness on an individual and cultural level. It is collaborating on issues using shared and unique experiences to make overall positive impacts. Global citizenship enables us to learn best practices which can benefit everyone. The more we collaborate, the stronger we are. 

    Where do you find your inspiration?

    My inspiration is from my personal experiences, curiosity, and the successes of our past. My initial source of inspiration to start working with a global mindset was my emigration to Australia, then back to Canada. It made me recognize the value of national similarities and differences. Many of the challenges faced in Canada are faced elsewhere and the solutions used in other places could be used in Canada. The power of our uniqueness can help us face problems together in creative ways. I am a naturally curious person that always wants to learn more and meet people. I strive to use my curiosity to benefit society and improve the status quo. Finally, the amount of positive change around the world is inspiring in itself. If we were able to improve conditions this much in many places, imagine what we can do today and in the future. 

    What do you see as one of the most encouraging or innovative trends that is creating positive change in our world right now?

    Youth today are getting exposure and experience to be global citizens earlier. Through technology and support of people in leadership, youth are being engaged to provide feedback and offer solutions. It is encouraging because youth have grown up in a very globalized world and have valuable insights. Technology has exposed young people to a very large variety of perspectives at a young age. It is also encouraging to know that leaders value our perspective because youth have a huge stake in making sure our future is brighter for everyone.

     


  • published Ed lehman in Global Citizen Nominees 2021 2021-02-04 13:15:44 -0600

    Ed Lehman, a leader in peace and economic justice.

    Ed Lehman has spent his entire adult life as a participant in struggles for peace and economic justice. As a teenager, Ed became active in the peace movement opposing the Vietnam War. In the half century since, he has taken an active and often leading role in many local, national and international campaigns as a member of numerous organizations including trade unions, peace and solidarity movements and local governments. 

    In 1976, at the age of twenty-two, Ed was the youngest candidate for Regina City Council as a member of the Committee of Progressive Electors, a slate stressing empowerment for working people, women and Indigenous Peoples. For decades, Ed has been a prominent public spokesperson on issues of peace and social justice. In addition to his activities in the labour movement and civic politics, Ed remained active in the peace and solidarity movements; especially with the Regina Peace Council for which he served as President and Vice-President on several occasions during the mid to late 1980's. Ed views nuclear war and global destruction from climate catastrophe as the two greatest threats facing humankind today.  He is currently a leading activist in the national No Fighter Jets Coalition, the national Campaign to Free Meng Wangzhou and the national Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions Coalition (working for justice for Palestinians).

    What does global citizenship mean to me? 

    Global citizenship to me means being concerned about humanity, and the world environment, and acting in solidarity with others to build a more just, equitable, peaceful, sustainable world that is free of discrimination, racism, hatred, and war.

    Where do you find your inspiration?

    As a young person I found my inspiration in the legacy of outstanding world citizens; primarily those who founded the World Peace Council and launched the first campaign, the Stockholm Appeal, to ban the bomb. Nationally, I was impressed with the work for peace and justice by Reverend James G. Endicott, co-founder of the Canadian Peace Congress and its first president; and Reverend John Hanley Morgan, its second president. As an educator I was very inspired by the work of the Brazilian author and educator, Paulo Freire. As an older peace activist I am inspired by people of all ages working for global cooperation, peace, and justice. I am inspired by 11-year-old environmentalist filmmaker Maria Marshall of Barbados and 17 year old Greta Thunberg of Sweden. I am inspired by Beatrice Fihn, Executive Director of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (38); Setsuko Thurlow, ICAN campaigner, (88); and Alfred Marder, President of the U.S. Peace Council (98). And last, but not least, I am inspired by my colleagues in the Regina Peace Council, PeaceQuest Regina, and Making Peace Vigil.

    What do you see as one of the most encouraging or innovative trends that is creating positive change in our world right now?

    The trend of countries to sign the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW) is very encouraging. It is the first legally binding international agreement to comprehensively prohibit nuclear weapons with the ultimate goal being their total elimination and will enter into force on 22nd January 2021. This marks a new chapter in the fight for nuclear disarmament.

     

     

     


  • published Aditi Garg in Global Citizen Nominees 2021 2021-02-04 12:54:36 -0600

    Aditi Garg, an outstanding teacher, environmental activist, and community leader.

    Aditi Garg is an outstanding teacher, environmental organizer, facilitator, and leader.  She is an inclusive community builder and brings people together in a time when that is needed more than ever. She gently challenges racism and other forms of discrimination and erasure in effective and engaging ways, through her social media presence and in-person. Aditi works toward goals that fit her values including environmental/outdoor knowledge and builds bridges to bring everyone along.

    Aditi has been involved in many organizations including as past president of SaskOutdoors, member of the Saskatoon Environmental Advisory Committee, volunteer and board member with the Saskatoon Symphony, and program consultant for Girl Guides of Canada. As an educator, Aditi has moved from teaching high school to supporting university curriculum development, specifically the internationalization of curriculum. She has an undergraduate degree in Mathematics and French Education from the University of Regina, and a Master of Science in Environment, Culture and Society from the University of Edinburgh.  Additionally, Aditi has training from the Climate Reality Project and Next Up Saskatchewan. She has facilitated workshops on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), on goal setting for non-profits, and on math education with the Saskatchewan Teachers’ Federation. 

    Aditi is generous with her time, often taking on intensive tasks that others shy away from. For the first five months of the pandemic, she did a minute of stairs for each positive COVID case (about 1500 minutes), and encouraged people to follow protocols to reduce risks for all.

    What does Global Citizenship mean to you?

    To me, a global citizen is an individual who thinks about the global impact of local actions.  They work towards nurturing their community in a way that benefits the world. As an environmental advocate, I sometimes negatively associate ‘global’ with industrialization and ‘citizen’ with conformity. However, when I think of the students I've taught and the values I wanted them to develop, many of the attributes correspond collectively to positive global citizenship. I want students to apply their critical thinking skills to the systems of power around them, to have empathy and respect for difference in their lives, and to respond to injustices with action. One of the most inspiring moments of my teaching career was when my students developed a blog about the SDGs in Saskatoon. I saw that their critical reflection on local actions helped them see how they too could contribute to lofty global goals. 

    Where do you find your inspiration?

    My inspiration comes from my grandmothers. They were both housewives who nurtured their families for most of their lives. They volunteered their time to support literacy programs, access to potable water and sanitation, job training for marginalized youth, food and nutrition programs, and many other initiatives. They taught us to care for children in need and to help those whose needs were greater than ours. My other inspirations are my parents. They taught my sisters and I to always help those less fortunate than us and to question the status quo. In our family, the least we could do is feed someone - whether it’s a guest in our home or those in need at a local soup kitchen. Growing up, my parents encouraged debate and discussion on difficult topics. Overall, this made our home a safe place to share.

    What do you see as one of the most encouraging or innovative trends that is creating positive change in our world right now?

    Due to COVID-19, all SaskOutdoors plans for 2020 changed with short notice. We transitioned to hosting virtual events. I wasn’t sure how it was going to work because of spotty online attendance in the past. However, we had amazing uptake from all corners of the province, including rural members. We hosted a virtual speed mingling event attended by over 100 outdoor and environmental educators eager for connection. We have sustained engagement as we re-affirm the need for outdoor education in an online world. More than ever, folks are looking online for how to be offline! I am encouraged by how learning communities are gathering remotely and how innovative our organization has been to meet their needs. Post-COVID, I hope we can remember these lessons and continue connecting. I think this will be a trend for at least the next decade – finding meaningful ways to connect both remotely and in-person.

     


  • published Global Citizen Nominees 2021 2021-02-01 15:42:51 -0600

    Global Citizen Nominees 2021

    Saskatchewan Council International Cooperation’s Global Citizen Awards have been recognizing Saskatchewan changemakers making important contributions to international cooperation, peace and global justice for 30 years!

    SCIC has made some changes to the Awards in 2021 to better reflect the spectrum of global changemakers we have in our community - we have expanded the categories to include a Lifetime Achievement Award category, a Youth Award category and an Emerging Global Citizen Award category.

    Due to the current COVID-19 pandemic, we will not be holding in-person events during International Development Week and therefore will be showcasing the 2021 Global Citizen Awards online.

    Winners will be selected by a committee and announced at the end of International Development Week (February 7-13, 2021). Check out below to read more about the contributions of these amazing 2021 nominated individuals. 


     

    Aditi Garg

    Aditi Garg is an outstanding teacher, environmental organizer, facilitator, and leader.  She is an inclusive community builder and brings people together in a time when that is needed more than ever. She gently challenges racism and other forms of discrimination and erasure in effective and engaging ways, through her social media presence and in-person. Aditi works toward goals that fit her values including environmental/outdoor knowledge and builds bridges to bring everyone along.

    Learn more about Aditi!

         
     

    Ed Lehman

    Ed Lehman has spent his entire adult life as a participant in struggles for peace and economic justice. As a teenager, Ed became active in the peace movement opposing the Vietnam War. In the half-century since, he has taken an active and often leading role in many local, national and international campaigns as a member of numerous organizations including trade unions, peace and solidarity movements and local governments.

    Learn more about Ed!

         
     

    Hannah Tait

    A recognized youth leader, Hannah has been chosen to participate in many national and global forums on wide-ranging topics where she advocates for stronger international relations through trade and diplomacy, human rights, women’s rights, diversity, and inclusion.

    Hannah was part of a delegation of the National Youth Ambassador Caucus hosted by Global Vision and focused on diversity and inclusion. At the 2019 Digital Citizenship Ambassador Summit she focused on online misinformation and its role in hindering strong democracies around the world.

    Learn more about Hannah!

         
     

    Mac-Miland Nji Mokom

    Mac-Miland Nji Mokom is a Registered Social Worker with the Saskatchewan Association of Social Workers (SASW), currently working with the Canadian Red Cross. Mac-Miland holds two degrees, one in Sociology and Anthropology and a second degree in Social Work from the University of Regina.

    Mac-Miland was actively engaged in multiple youth development programs in Cameroon including serving as the Regional Secretary of the Cameroon Alliance for Youth Movement (CAMAYM) where he aided several socio-economic programs in Northwest Cameroon.

    Learn more about Mac-Miland!

         
     

    Dr. Margot Hurlbert

    After practicing law in Regina, Dr. Margot Hurlbert became a professor at the University of Regina in the Departments of Justice Studies and Sociology and Social Studies. In 2018 she was awarded the Canada Research Chair in Climate Change, Energy, and Sustainability Policy at the Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy where she is the Lead of the Science, Technology and Innovation Research Cluster. She is a Senior Research Fellow of the Earth Systems Governance Project, and was the Coordinating Lead Author of a chapter of the Special Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) on Land and Climate. Margot is Review Editor for the North America Chapter of Working Group II of the IPCC and currently works on Future Earth’s Working Group on Transformations.

    Learn more about Margot!

         
     

    Namarta Kochar

    Namarta Kochar, Special Projects Officer in Strategic Communications at the University of Saskatchewan, has helped strengthen various spheres throughout Saskatchewan, and helped address and bring awareness to global issues facing our community such as diversity, equity and inclusion, healthcare, the environment, and poverty. A recognized humanitarian, change-maker and mentor, Namarta has been a catalyst for improving the quality of life for others in our community and promoting human dignity for all.

    Learn more about Namarta!

         
     

    Samia Sami

    Samia Sami is pursuing a degree in Electrical Engineering at the University of Saskatchewan (UofS). By specializing in power and energy, she combines her passion for the environment with a love of design and technology.  

    Samia conducted two research projects in renewable energy, including the use of artificial intelligence to predict the security status of renewable microgrids in remote communities across Canada and has received the People’s Choice Award in recognition of her research. As a UofS delegate, Samia presented her research at the Women in Science and Engineering National Conference in Toronto.

    Learn more about Samia!

         
     

    Shayne Lazarowich

    Shayne Lazarowich is a musician, songwriter, internationalist, anti-racist organizer, community enabler, and advocate for multiculturalism and reconciliation. His music reaches deep into your soul and is a shoutout for peace, harmony, and social justice for all.

    Shayne has lived and worked internationally, in various capacities and contexts, for a substantial part of his adult life. His work has taken him to Guatemala for two years, Taiwan for eight years, and more recently, to Nicaragua for three years, working with organizations such as Canada World Youth/Jeunesse Canada Monde and El Instituto de Promoción Humana (INPRHU). Shayne currently resides between Saskatoon, Canada and Estelí, Nicaragua.

    Learn more about Shayne!

         
     

    Simon Granovsky-Larsen

    Simon Granovsky-Larsen, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Politics and International Studies at the University of Regina where he teaches courses on international development and international politics.

    Since 2004, Simon has worked on and off in Guatemala as a human rights accompanier, independent journalist, and academic researcher. His recent projects have looked at violence against land and environmental defenders; changes to paramilitary violence; the militarization of extractive industries, including the security practices of Canadian mining projects and other transnational mega-development projects; and the role of social movements and agrarian conflicts in the Guatemalan peace process.

    Learn more about Simon!

         
     

    Ziyang (Zeo) Li

    As the Vice President of Student Affairs at the University of Regina Students' Union (URSU), Zeo works with his team members to carry out successful campaigns and programs that benefit students. These include a Mental Wellness Campaign for students from diverse communities (domestic, international, LGBTQ+), designing a Community Service Month for supporting students to initiate their community projects by providing micro-grants, as well as promoting dialogue by organizing a Next Gen Leaders Debate during the 2020 Saskatchewan election.

    Learn more about Ziyang!


  • published International Development Week 2021-01-18 13:44:37 -0600

    International Development Week 2021

    BEtter for All: Diversity. Inclusion. Equality.

    International Development Week (IDW) is a national initiative to engage Canadians from coast-to-coast-to-coast with the collective work of ending global poverty, advancing human rights, combating climate change and improving equitable access to health and education the world over. Throughout the week (February 7-13, 2021) SCIC will highlight contributions toward sustainable global development, that leaves no one behind, and share stories and skills for folks across Saskatchewan to get involved.

    Inspired by Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy (FIAP) Action Area of Inclusive Governance, SCIC’s BEtter Campaign recognizes that sustainable development means institutions, policies, processes and services need to be accessible, accountable and responsive to all peoples. Change takes all of us; and a sustainable world is an equitable, diverse and inclusive world.

    Learn about International Development Week 2021 across Canada, and check out some online events below happening right here in Saskatchewan!



    Our Events

     

    Art IS Social Action | Online Discussion

    Does your changemaker toolbox include sharpies, paint, and a new perspective? Join us for a discussion with artists and activists about the role of art, creative action, and media in global social justice movements.

    Learn more


    Art IS Influence | Keynote with Notorious Cree

    Notorious Cree (@NotoriousCree | jonesdancer.com) joins SCIC to discuss the role of art in influencing social change. His talk will focus on sharing his journey and insights into how he uses social media and traditional art to educate and engage audiences from around the world with Indigenous culture.

    Learn more


    BEtter for All - Diversity. Inclusion. Equality. | Keynote with Samra Zafar

    Join us for a keynote address from bestselling author Samra Zafar as she discusses the importance of equity in feminism and how we can address barriers and create solutions through a lens of intersectionality.

    Learn more


    IDW Classroom Art Contest

    At SCIC we believe that art can make people stop and think, art can move people to action, but it doesn’t have to be traditional. Storytelling can be done in street art, in protest signs and across roadways (as in BLM on the streets of Washington, and rainbow crosswalks). We believe that art is activism!

    The “BEtter for All: Diversity. Inclusion. Equality” Classroom Art Contest challenges you to get creative and inspire others using art. Add your voice, along with your classmates’ voices, to a global movement of creating diversity, inclusion, and equality for all.

    Learn more


    Youth Week of Action | Youth-Led Social Media Engagement

    During #IDW2021 from Monday, February 8 to Friday, February 12, 2021, SCIC is encouraging youth to take part in a Week of Action in their communities to generate momentum towards a world that is BEtter for All: Diversity. Inclusion. Equality. 

    Follow SCIC on all our social media platforms to participate and be a part of the movement @SaskCIC on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.


    Art AS Engagement | Livestream with Bruno Hernani

    Engage with artist and global justice activist Bruno Hernani (find him on Facebook) as he shares insights into the development of a large scale artist installation throughout the week via a social media live stream, and discusses how art can be used for social change.

    Inspired by a strong message of human rights, peace, security, and intersectional discrimination, the final installation will incorporate Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) 3: health and well-being; SDG 5: gender equality; SDG 10: reducing inequalities; and SDG 16: peace, justice and strong institutions.


    Global Citizen Awards

    Saskatchewan Council International Cooperation’s Global Citizen Awards have been recognizing Saskatchewan changemakers making important contributions to international cooperation, peace and global justice for 30 years!

    SCIC has made some changes to the Awards in 2021 to better reflect the spectrum of global changemakers we have in our community - we have expanded the categories to include a Lifetime Achievement Award category, a Youth Award category and an Emerging Global Citizen Award category.

    Due to the current COVID-19 pandemic, we will not be holding in-person events during International Development Week and therefore will be showcasing the 2021 Global Citizen Awards online. This year, we will be featuring ALL 10 of our nominees throughout International Development Week by sharing highlights of inspirational stories with our network and beyond. These highlights will bring attention to and celebrate the incredible work you do.

    Winners will be selected by a committee and announced at the end of International Development Week (February 7-13, 2021). Stay tuned to our channels as we share the contributions of these amazing individuals with you.


    International Development Week events and programs are undertaken with the financial support of the Government of Canada provided through Global Affairs Canada.

     


  • published Art IS Influence Keynote with Notorious Cree 2021-01-18 13:44:23 -0600

    BEtter for All - Diversity. Inclusion. Equality.

    Art IS Influence | Keynote with Notorious Cree

    Notorious Cree is a men’s fancy Powwow dancer who is ranked as top 3 world hoop dancer. He also plays the flute and hand drum. Notorious Cree blends traditional, modern and contemporary arts to showcase high energy performances both in-person and online. He has an impressive TikTok presence and has attracted millions of followers across social media platforms.

    Notorious Cree (@NotoriousCree | jonesdancer.com) will join SCIC during International Development Week for an online session to discuss the role of art in influencing social change. His talk will focus on sharing his journey and insights into how he uses social media and traditional art to educate and engage audiences from around the world with Indigenous culture.

    Register Here!


  • published Art IS Social Action Panel Discussion 2021-01-18 13:12:36 -0600

    BEtter for All: Diversity. Inclusion. Equality.

    Art IS Social Action | Online Discussion

    Creative expression illuminates global inequality and racism. Art is an effective tool in the quest for global social change in movements such as Black Lives Matter, the struggle against police brutality and for 2SLGBTQ+ rights. It helps to honour Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls and amplifies global movements for indigenous and international solidarity.

    Does your changemaker toolbox include sharpies, paint, and a new perspective? Join us for a discussion with artists and activists about the role of art, creative action, and media in global social justice movements.

    Register here!


  • published Keynote with Samra Zafar 2021-01-14 14:26:44 -0600

    BEtter for All - Diversity. Inclusion. Equality. | Keynote with Samra Zafar

    Women have made great progress, but the barriers to women’s advancement are still very much present in every level of society, especially when it comes to women from immigrant, newcomer, refugee, faith-based, indigenous, and other cultural communities-women who have been taught for generations that they don’t matter.

    Join us for a keynote address from bestselling author Samra Zafar as she discusses the importance of equity in feminism and how we can address barriers and create solutions through a lens of intersectionality.

    Register Here!

    About Samra Zafar

    When she was 17, Samra Zafar was forced into an abusive marriage, which she escaped years later. Since then, her powerful story of vulnerability, hope and resilience has captivated audiences across Canada and beyond. Her book, A Good Wife, became a national bestseller, and is now being adapted for television. Samra is the recipient of the Top 25 Canadian Immigrant Award and was awarded 100 Most Powerful Women status by the Women's Executive Network, recognizing women for their incredible achievements, and inspiring future generations. Samra speaks to audiences in corporate, education and non-profit sectors on a variety of topics, including leadership, resilience, mental health and human rights.

    Find Samra’s Book Here

    Additionally, listen to one of Samra’s TedTalks below,

    Be Your Own Hero

    The Culture of Honour

    I Was Abused as a Child Bride and this is What I Learn


  • BEtter for All: Diversity. Inclusion. Equality.

    International Development Week Classroom Art Contest

    It is International Development Week in Canada, February 7-13, an annual initiative held during the first week of February since 1991 to engage Canadians on global issues.

    At SCIC we believe that art can make people stop and think, art can move people to action, but it doesn’t have to be traditional. Storytelling can be done in street art, in protest signs and across roadways (as in BLM on the streets of Washington, and rainbow crosswalks). We believe that art is activism!

    The “BEtter for All: Diversity. Inclusion. Equality.” Classroom Art Contest challenges you to get creative and inspire others using art. Add your voice, along with your classmates’ voices, to a global movement of creating diversity, inclusion, and equality for all.

    Rules & Guidelines:

    1. The contest is open to K-12 Classrooms in Saskatchewan 
    2. Classrooms will read the book “If The World Were a Village” by David J. Smith together as a class.
    3. Classes will decide on a theme in the book focussed around diversity, inclusion and equality that they want to represent through their art creations.
    4. Each student will create a work of art to reflect the theme the class chose from the book, “If The World Were a Village” and put their works of art together with their classmates’ works of art to create one large classroom art piece. This collaborative art piece will be submitted in the form of a photo of the combined pieces.
    5. Only one submission per class.
    6. Each class submission must be original and previously unpublished. It must also be the sole work of the students.
    7. Your class submission should take into account SCIC’s Value Statement: We are committed to the recognition of the dignity of all people and their right to self-determination, to the protection of the world’s fragile environment, to the equitable distribution of power, and to the promotion of global understanding, cooperation, peace and justice through mutual learning, partnership, transparency and solidarity.
    8. Classes and Teachers must agree to have the picture of their combined art project posted on SCIC’s social media channels (other information included with the photograph will be School, Grade, and Teacher’s Name).
    9. The winner will be chosen by SCIC’s Board of Directors through a voting process.
    10. The winning classroom will be awarded a Global Citizenship Education Package valued at $1000.

    Where to find “If The World Were a Village”:

    1. Check your school’s library - you just might have a copy available!
    2. Order your own copy from Amazon, or ask your school’s teacher-librarian to order a copy for the school.
    3. Check out the free Read Aloud on YouTube 

    If the World Were a Village: A Book about the World's People by David J. Smith, Shelagh Armstrong (Illustrator)

    The 2nd Edition of the best-selling book which has sold over 400 000 copies in 17 languages -- updated with new content and insights about the world's people. First published to wide acclaim in 2002, this eye-opening book has since become a classic, promoting "world-mindedness" by imagining the world's population -- all 6.8 billion of us -- as a village of just 100 people. Now, If the World Were a Village has been newly revised with updated statistics, several new activities and completely new material on food security, energy and health. By exploring the lives of the 100 villagers, children will discover that life in other nations is often very different from their own. If the World Were a Village is part of CitizenKid: A collection of books that inform children about the world and inspire them to be better global citizens.


    Ready to send? Send your submission to SCIC’s Education Program Coordinator - Amy at [email protected]

    When submitting please include: name of the school, location of the school, grade of participating class, and Teacher’s name.

    *** All entries must be submitted by Monday, March 1, 2021 at 5pm (CST) ***


  • Online Education Resources SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities

    Published July 7th, 2020

     

    SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities is all about empowering and promoting the social, economic and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or another status. Explore the human faces of global inequalities using these resources. 


    COVID-19 hurts us all. But the impacts of the crisis are hurting communities of colour, including children, more. These resources from Embrace Race center the needs of Black, Indigenous, and People of Colour and other racialized communities most impacted by the COVID-19 crisis.

    Embrace Race also has curated book lists that encourage diverse authors and topics.


    Voices into Action (FAST) 

    This free online educational program meets the requirements of Canadian secondary school curricula. Explore social justice issues – both past and current. Become empowered to speak out and take action against hatred and all forms of discrimination.


    Youth for Human Rights

    The purpose of YHRI is to teach youth about human rights, specifically the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and inspire them to become advocates for tolerance and peace. 


    Photographs are a valuable tool in global citizenship, helping learners to explore similarities and differences; strengthen questioning, critical thinking and cooperation skills; challenge assumptions and stereotypes; build empathy and develop respect for others.

    Use this colourful collection of images and accompanying activities to help learners aged 7-14 years to consider the importance of food and farming around the world, as well as the challenges some people face in getting enough food to eat.